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Greetings, Skipta Community:
We have summarized the following peer-reviewed journal article for your consideration. We welcome your feedback.

TITLE: Sentinel node biopsy should not be routine in older patients with ER-Positive HER2-Negative breast cancer who are willing and able to take hormone therapy
Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNLB) is recommended in clinically node-negative women aged 70 years and more with ER breast cancer, per the SSO Choosing Wisely Campaign. In the current study, researchers identified 2662 women aged 70 years or older treated with ER HER2- breast cancer between 2010 and 2016, and analyzed the association between SLNB positivity with the use of adjuvant treatments and overall survival and breast-cancer specific survival (BCSS).
The researchers found that SLNB was positive in 25% of patients. Factors associated with SLNB positivity included increased use of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiotherapy. During a median follow-up period of 4.3 years, 5-year OS was 86%, and BCSS was 96%.
“BCSS in this population was excellent at 96%, and BCSS was similar with negative and positive SLNB when patients received HT [hormone therapy],” concluded the authors. “SLNB can be omitted in elderly patients willing to take HT.”
QUESTIONS:
1) Do you think that SLNB can be omitted in the study’s older patient population? Why or why not?
2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of the current study?

Sentinel Node Biopsy Should Not be Routine in Older Patients with ER-Positive HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Who Are Willing and Able to Take Hormone Therapy - PubMed

Sentinel Node Biopsy Should Not be Routine in Older Patients with ER-Positive HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Who Are Willing and Able to Take Hormone Therapy - PubMed

Source :

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33817760/

doi: 10.1245/s10434-021-09839-6. Online ahead of print. 1 Providence Breast Centre, Mount Saint Joseph Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. EMcKevitt@providencehealth.bc.ca. 2 Department of Surgery, BC Cancer, Vancouver, Canada. EMcKevitt@providencehealth.bc.ca. 3 Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. EMcKevitt@providencehealth.bc.ca. 4 Department of Surgery, BC Cancer, Vancouver, Canada.